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Networking vs Selling? Selling is more lucrative

Networking might earn you a bunch of new friends. But selling is what you get paid to do.
Written Mar 15, 2010, read 2899 times since then.
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Increasingly today’s average sales rep and small business owner begin their weeks scanning social networking sites and email planning meetings and events in which to attend. They see networking as the means by which they intend to gain customers and grow the business and subsequently their incomes. These events are flush with people, business cards at the ready, who hope to have potential customers ask them about their business, products, or services. It’s the fruitlessness of these efforts, or at least how these efforts are applied, that has proven that selling and not networking is the path to true business success.

Before you raise your hackles and prepare to excoriate me for bad mouthing that which is so fully embraced by society today, realize that I participate in networking events in person and on line and intend to continue to do so. I just expect my income and my company’s income to be acquired more fully from good old fashioned selling. And anyone who treats their professions differently should not expect to remain in their professions long.

The economy and its resulting high unemployment find more and more people coming into the sales industry in one form or another through necessity. In the case of many the career change will be permanent and lucrative. For others frustration and lack of success and another career change await. What differentiates them will not necessarily be product or service represented but the willingness to embrace sales and selling as the honorable career for which it is. As sales trainer Brian Tracy says ,”sales is the oldest profession. Some think something else is the oldest profession, but that’s only a sub-set of sales”.

Nothing happens without sales. No product is manufactured, or delivered. No accountant crunches numbers. No employment of any kind occurs without the sale taking place. And no sale takes place without a hard working person making it so. That person lives based on their actual output. That person and that person’s family relies on him or her closing sales for their income and ability to pay bills and enjoy life’s distractions. If you can’t respect a person living that kind of existence it’s only because you have never had to do likewise.

When Networking a simplified description of your activity would be as follows: Attend a meeting of business people; people related through mutual membership in a common group or association. If done properly you meet new people, engage in friendly conversation, exchange business cards, and usually after meeting these same people 2, 3, or 4 times at similar events you agree to meet privately for coffee, where you share greater detail about each others business in hopes that the other wants your product or service or at least knows someone else who MIGHT be able to use your product or service. In the end under the best of circumstances with this scenario your goal of achieving a sale is dependant on hope. Hope that you’ll go to enough events, that you’ll meet enough people, and that enough of those people will be dazzled by you or your product to consider buy from you. It’s passive selling. It’s not proactive.

When selling you are proactive. You seek out the best potential customers; customers who legitimately need or could use your product. You do this by phone, by knocking on doors, or, yes, by attending networking events; strategically planning what networking events you attend. When you speak with these strategically sought-out potential customers you ask for the opportunity to present to them, and by present I mean you give a professional presentation however it’s done for your product or service and at the conclusion of your presentation you ASK FOR THE ORDER. You ask for the sale. You close. Any presentation that doesn’t include asking for the order is not a sales presentation. It’s networking. It’s passive. Having made a well-prepared, rehearsed and tried and true sales presentation complete with asking for the order your chances of securing a sale improve immensely. And whether a sale is made upon completion of a presentation you then repeat the process. Then you do it again and again. It’s proactive. And it’s effective.

Your presentation should be short. Various sales trainers recommend where possible from start to finish when performed without interruption your sales presentation should be no more than 10 minutes. When approaching individuals or business owners no one has time to give half-hour or an hour to a sales representative. But anybody can give ten minutes. In addition to your standard formatted presentation you should have equally prepared and rehearsed answers to the inevitable questions, interruptions and objections that will arise in any sales presentation. Your answers need to always be structured to lead you inexorably back to your presentation and/or your closing question. The manner in which your answers are structured and wrap up depends on whether you are responding to an interruption, objection, or question.

Always remember that an interruption is any negative statement by the customers intended to end your sales attempt prior to you having shared the bottom line, or the price, with said customer. Since your customer has little or no idea of what you will present as the bottom line you should not give “the interruption” much weight. Baring a disqualifying statement like, “I just filed for bankruptcy” you should treat your customers “interruption” like a speed bump instead of a stop sign.

An objection is any negative statement by the customers intended to end your sales attempt after you have shared the bottom line, the price. Or an “objection” is any “interruption” that is repeated. An “objection” has weight and must be dealt with to your customer’s complete satisfaction, or no sale can take place. Upon hearing an objection, since you’ve prepared and have obviously heard the objection before, you should respond with the most positive rehearsed and appropriate reply possible. And then before proceeding specifically ask your customer if you have answered their concern; only you don’t call it a concern to your customer. If at all, you call it a question.

A “question” is any statement by your customer structured in the form of a question occurring at any time before, during or after your presentation in which the answer leads directly to you asking for the order, your closing question. An example would be “Do you deliver?” or “Can I get this in a different color?” or “Do you take credit cards?”.

Selling requires proactive activity by the person wanting the sale. It’s not passive, which Networking tends to be. Networking can work better for you provided it’s merely used as a proactive step in the selling process. The fear that people don’t like to be “sold” is a little like saying as a child that you don’t want to eat your vegetables. Liking it or not doesn’t change it’s necessity. A business owner or sales representative who only Networks and will not actually practice and engage in the sales process is not unlike a parent who only feeds their children fast food. You might get ‘em to like you, but getting them to respect you and benefit from the experience requires a little more.

Thanks for visiting. Comments are welcome.

Learn more about the author, Michael Schuett.

Comment on this article

  • Mentor For Hire 
Kirkland, Washington 
Nadir Zulqernain, Ph.D.
    Posted by Nadir Zulqernain, Ph.D., Kirkland, Washington | Mar 15, 2010

    The article itself is excellent. I do want to point out though that the two need not be in opposing camps - almost always, the desired outcome of networking is selling. I guess networking, in that sense is similar to prospecting - the ultimate goal being 'sales'.

  • Sales Mentor, Sales Coach, Sales Trainer, Consultant, Speaker, Humorist, Social Entrepreneur 
Southamption, Hampshire United Kingdom 
Terry Murphy
    Posted by Terry Murphy, Southamption, Hampshire United Kingdom | Mar 18, 2010

    Well said Michael. As Nadir says, networking is 'merely' prospecting. It is a marketing exercise. A great one, that can also be one of the most fun, but only one of many needed typically in order to prospect sufficiently.

    Networking is often of course more to do with business interaction than even marketing. I am always amazed at the 'business cards at the ready' brigade. I hear what you do in 1 minute and then have a business card from you...and this would make me buy from you. No, give out the business card sparingly to those you identify as potential clients or business contacts...then nurture.

    As for business, anyone who says they get all their business without having to sell is either a multi-millionaire (with a Midas touch) or has a fun and perhaps quite lucrative hobby.

    Thnx again Michael...loved the read and the sentiment.

  • Business Coach, Trainer and Marketing Consultant  
Elk River, Minnesota 
Jane Morrison
    Posted by Jane Morrison, Elk River, Minnesota | Mar 18, 2010

    Michael,

    I loved this distinction between networking and selling. I see many people weak in the 'selling" link, more often staying positive and "hoping" that is enough. This is a good "kick in the pants" for me too.

  • Leadership Performance Coach 
Eugene , Oregon 
Corinne McElroy
    Posted by Corinne McElroy, Eugene , Oregon | Mar 18, 2010

    Hi Michael, Thank you for the article. I lot of small business owners are the ones that are out there promoting their own business. I hear them say "I do not want to be a pushy salesperson". At times our belief system of what a salesperson is and what their behaviors are does get in the way. It can and will hold us back from one of the main reasons most have joined networking events for, to build our businesses. Thank you for the reminder.

  • Seattle Printing, Mailing Services, Fulfillment Services 
Bellingham, Washington 
Jess Robinson
    Posted by Jess Robinson, Bellingham, Washington | Mar 18, 2010

    Excellent reminder, Michael. This distinction between selling and networking might seem harsh to some, but your point about asking for the order is one that escapes many entrepreneurs. I couldn't agree more with Nadir about networking and selling not being mutually exclusive. In fact I'm finding networking an effective adjunct to cold calling and prospecting. Networking builds relationships and relationships always form the foundation to satisfying customer relationships.

    Excellent article, Michael.

  • Partner, Talent Acquisition Strategist 
Gig Harbor, Washington 
Jennifer Bowen
    Posted by Jennifer Bowen, Gig Harbor, Washington | Mar 18, 2010

    Fantastic motivator, Michael. Many business owners and sales people today are simply hiding behind their Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook accounts. They feel that putting the effort into those networks will bring the sales. But as many have said above, that's just the prospecting or marketing aspect. Now you've got to sell to those connections.

  • Mentor For Hire 
Kirkland, Washington 
Nadir Zulqernain, Ph.D.
    Posted by Nadir Zulqernain, Ph.D., Kirkland, Washington | Mar 18, 2010

    "an effective adjunct to cold calling and prospecting" is a most articulate way to put it, Jess.

    Jane, I have taught an intra-personal "communication" program for more than 20 years -- frequently it has a stronger "selling skills" element to it, depending on the audience -- in this program we separate the people you were referring to and I call that group 'hopotrons'.

    Terry's suggestion to be selective when handing out your business cards is an excellent one, in my experience produces far better results than a shotgun approach -- when I attend these and networking events, my aim is to hand out no more than five business cards if the group is 50 or more, and see business cards the group is less than 20. This has worked pretty well for me over the years. As Terry points out you then need to really nurture and develop those relationships -- of course, delivering a superb consumer experience, when you get somebody's business, we go farther than anything else.

  • Realtor 
Seattle, Washington 
Christina McDonald
    Posted by Christina McDonald, Seattle, Washington | Mar 18, 2010

    Michael, Thank you for your article. As a Realtor, I very much relate to your commentary. I started in the business before the real estate boom and found it very easy to "sell". Since the market shifted, I realized that I needed to learn how to really be a salesperson. It is a skill and I am now becoming a good salesperson. Your article helps me focus my energies in the right places and develop the right skills. I love people and networking is fun but I agree, unless we ask for the order, we're just having fun! Thanks much!

  • Instructor & Manager 
Vashon, Washington 
Emily Wigley
    Posted by Emily Wigley, Vashon, Washington | Mar 18, 2010

    Good article, Michael, and timely for me as I contemplate joining a new lunch networking gathering in my community. There are BizNik folks whose services are not the kind that require two or three networking events, a coffee get together and then the salesmanship begins. Services that are not business to business can be sold in one network event meeting simply and easily. Sometimes networking is salesmanship when the service is simple. Keeping in mind that networking is a business activity and not a friend-trolling activity helps keep the focus, too. Thank you for a great read.

  • Motivational Speaker and Author 
Bothell, Washington 
John C Erdman
    Posted by John C Erdman, Bothell, Washington | Mar 18, 2010

    Michael, good reminder to those who view networking as the only step in the sales process. As I recommend in my article on Networking - http://biznik.com/articles/networking-the-best-promotion-for-successful-business you do not sell at networking events. This is the time to prospect and build relationships. It is much like the old trade shows. You connected with a lot of people but you still had to follow up with the qualified leads. As several people have mentioned you need a good plan before you go to network and if it is a Biznik event you can see who is coming to the event and target your networking to the people who are your typical prospects. I plan on meeting 3 to 5 good prospects at any networking event and then follow up afterwards with them. The selling starts at an appointment where it is understood that I am selling my products or services. Again, good advice to people that networking is just the start of the selling process.

  • Video Production  
Renton, Washington 
Michael Schuett
    Posted by Michael Schuett, Renton, Washington | Mar 18, 2010

    Thank you for all the comments...please keep them coming. I have to confess that the title of this article is intentionally provocative in order to draw in readers. As I state in the article I don't think selling and networking are mutually exclusive. However, I do frequently see small business owners and some sales represetatives who refuse to engage in the sales process but are all over the networking. My point in writing the article and my previous article "The Most Important Aspect of Business NOT Done by Business Owners", http://biznik.com/articles/the-most-important-aspect-of-business-not-done-by-business-owners is to encourage selling. I believe some don't know to do this and some don't know how. In these and coming articles it will be my goal to help them learn what I've learned, give them tangible practices, and hopefully grow and learn as a sales person/business owner.

    Michael Schuett www.totalbroadcasting.com

  • Regional Manager 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Patrick Plummer
    Posted by Patrick Plummer, Roanoke, Virginia | Mar 18, 2010

    The money is on the street. My sales come from walking in doors and meeting with the owner and closing the sale.

  • Business/Intuitive Coach 
Federal Way, Washington 
Victoria Leo
    Posted by Victoria Leo, Federal Way, Washington | Mar 18, 2010

    Has anyone read Gravitational Marketing? I have to tell this author that even when I am looking for a product if I meet his kind of "sales pitch" I pitch the pitcher out the door. The world has changed in the past 5 years, as Malcolm Gladwell points out so well. We're all fed up and tired of being sold. Your ideas may still work for you, but in general the era of pushy "overcoming the objection" selling is over.

  • V/P Social Media Marketing 
Nashville, Tennessee 
Christine Taylor
    Posted by Christine Taylor, Nashville, Tennessee | Mar 18, 2010

    Great post! One of the biggest problems I see is the fear of sales. Sales itself has become a dirty word. We are all in sales. We sell ourselves, our companies our ideas.

  • Marketing Consultant 
Nanuet, New York 
Julie Weishaar
    Posted by Julie Weishaar, Nanuet, New York | Mar 18, 2010

    Great article and subsequent comments. I think in addition to some being afraid to being perceived as pushy, some get so caught up in the networking and the numbers game that they DO forget why they are networking in the first place. I had a conversation with a man recently who proudly told me that he has 1000 Facebook fanpage followers. I congratulated him and asked how many of those followers have either become customers or might be good prospective customers. There was dead silence on the other end of the phone. Clearly - he forgot what his ultimate goal is.

    Thanks for the reminder that networking is important but that it is not the end-all - you still have to finish the process by closing the sale.

  • Instructor & Manager 
Vashon, Washington 
Emily Wigley
    Posted by Emily Wigley, Vashon, Washington | Mar 18, 2010

    I totally agree, Julie. I'm at the opposite end of the spectrum: sometimes I need to remember why networking is smart! A happy medium of community and clientele is a healthy, profitable middle ground!

  • Video Production  
Renton, Washington 
Michael Schuett
    Posted by Michael Schuett, Renton, Washington | Mar 18, 2010

    Thank you again everyone for your comments. Please keep 'em coming. Victoria- your comments or similar thoughts and words were certainly something that I expected. Why? Because someone has been saying them since the first sales job I ever had over 25 years ago. I strongly suspect someone has been claiming the era of "overcoming the objection" selling as over for some time before that. It's not. Nor should it be. Sadly neither is the pushy sales person. I would never advocate being pushy with a customer. Yet, it's easy to see how some people perceive friendly persuasion as "pushy". A good sales person will always try to be sensitive to that....while they ask for the order. Using prepared presentations, and rehearsed, perfected responses is what I call professionalism. To call such activities a "pitch", and saying you'll pitch the pitcher out the door is clever word play but hardly constructive. A solid well rehearsed and prepared presentation is also called serving the customer. By having the courage to ask questions and to answer those questions and concerns confidently you add to the customers comfort and lead them to the "yes" that they so desperately want to give. Being pro-active and moving toward a sale is certainly done more agressively by some than others. But the world hasn't changed that much in 50 years, let alone 5 years. Bad sales people or what you would call "pitchmen" were as undesirable then as they are now. With a tight economy and businesses trying their very best to maximize productivity and sales good, professional sales people who know how to ask for the order are even more desirable now than 50 years ago. In closing I would advise any person reading this whose living is dependent upon sales results to trust the tried and true, such as the counsel offered in my articles; which I picked up from other successful sales people. Realize that someone will always try to paint sales people who sell with a negative brush. And realize people are people. And the biggest lesson I ever learned in sales is that people are fearful. They're fearful of making a mistake...in their buying decision. Your job as a sales person is to alleviate that fear and, yes, overcome the objection, and ask for the order; again, if neccessary.

    Michael Schuett www.totalbroadcasting.com

  • Sales Mentor, Sales Coach, Sales Trainer, Consultant, Speaker, Humorist, Social Entrepreneur 
Southamption, Hampshire United Kingdom 
Terry Murphy
    Posted by Terry Murphy, Southamption, Hampshire United Kingdom | Mar 18, 2010

    I'm enthralled by this thread. A great number of people are admitting and realizing the importance of 'selling'. What I think is key to remember, and Victoria with the greatest respect for your cautious approach this includes you, is that everyone sells all the time.

    For some reason, so many in business, mess up their natural selling skills. If you are not a pushy person, you can and should sell without pushing. If you are particularly gregarious or humourous or serious, then this is how you will best sell.

    Totally agree Michael, selling, psychology and the way we react hasn't really changed. I also agree with your comments that we are there to support our client or customer's buying decision, give them the information they need to make the right decision and build trust in order to 'do business'.

  • Mentor For Hire 
Kirkland, Washington 
Nadir Zulqernain, Ph.D.
    Posted by Nadir Zulqernain, Ph.D., Kirkland, Washington | Mar 19, 2010

    Simplest way to put it is that in every interaction a sale takes place - one sells the other - sometimes, neither is aware of it.

    I am an old fashioned salesman and subscribe to J. Doug Edwards (if that name doesn't ring a bell, Tom Hopkins learned everything from Edwards) teachings - "there is no such thing as closing too soon or too often" - does that make me "pushy"? not in the least, I am the politest person you will ever meet:-)

  • Realtor, Closing Agent 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 
Marjorie Ann Watson
    Posted by Marjorie Ann Watson, Colorado Springs, Colorado | Mar 20, 2010

    Awesome article. I think we each should have a balance and I know that I tend to become overwhelmed by the the social networking on the internet, which I know works; however, the old fashioned getting to know people face to face and building a relationship still works very well.

  • Owner, Med Spa 
Charlotte, North Carolina 
Elaine  Greenberg
    Posted by Elaine Greenberg, Charlotte, North Carolina | Mar 20, 2010

    Thank you for expressing what I had to learn the hard way. If your business targets a very specific, high-end clientele, traditional networking may be an (enjoyable) waste of time. It is more productive to market your business and sell your services and products to those who are your ideal client, imho.

  • Mentor For Hire 
Kirkland, Washington 
Nadir Zulqernain, Ph.D.
    Posted by Nadir Zulqernain, Ph.D., Kirkland, Washington | Mar 20, 2010

    Elaine,

    I couldn't disagree more. Having sold some of the biggest ticket items around, for many years, it is my experience that the higher and more exclusive you go the more you need your networking skills. Just spend a day on any major, exclusive golf club and you will see this in action.

  • Job 
Delhi India 
peter cox
    Posted by peter cox, Delhi India | Mar 20, 2010

    Comment content deleted by Biznik staff. In the future, please flag the member posting inappropriate content and we will take appropriate action. To flag a member, visit their profile. In the lower left hand corner are controls to indicate the type of behavior and provide any additional comments. The flagged member is not notified of your action.

    • Biznik Staff
  • Video Production  
Renton, Washington 
Michael Schuett
    Posted by Michael Schuett, Renton, Washington | Mar 20, 2010

    Were it within my capabilities I would delete the previous comment as it is clearly nothing more than an attempt at promoting his business. I am eager to be helpful to all who wish to promote their business, even through comments on articles. But so blatant an attempt while providing no helpful advice or insite on this article, its contents, or the contents of the following comments should be frowned upon. Mr. Cox you must give in order to get.

    Michael Schuett www.totalbroadcasting.com

  • Owner, Med Spa 
Charlotte, North Carolina 
Elaine  Greenberg
    Posted by Elaine Greenberg, Charlotte, North Carolina | Mar 20, 2010

    @ Nadir: I should clarify. By "traditional networking events" I mean those events specifically organized to meet other business people, perhaps give and listen to 1-2 minute elevator speeches, and exchange business cards. I did not mean to imply that establishing relationships, on the golf course or elsewhere, is not productive.

    On the other hand, in our experience, not all women want to talk about their Botox! They look fabulous -- naturally.

  • Mentor For Hire 
Kirkland, Washington 
Nadir Zulqernain, Ph.D.
    Posted by Nadir Zulqernain, Ph.D., Kirkland, Washington | Mar 20, 2010

    Of course. I fully agree with you. Botox? what is that? I am certain that no woman has ever used it!

  • Coworking, Office Space and Meeting Rooms / Strategic and Business Planning Consultant 
Issaquah, Washington 
Richard Gabel
    Posted by Richard Gabel, Issaquah, Washington | Mar 21, 2010

    Successful entrepreneurs are skilled at using their time to develop relatiosnhips with people that are vital to the success of their business. Networking should be used to build relationships. Getting a lead or making a sale should be an unintended consequence of networking. Too many people treat networking events like a cold call orgy. That's not what they're for.

    Bravo for sales professionals.

  • CEO & Owner - Joseph Merlo 
Hendersonville, Tennessee 
Joseph Merlo
    Posted by Joseph Merlo, Hendersonville, Tennessee | Mar 22, 2010

    I think the title says it all!

  • Mentor For Hire 
Kirkland, Washington 
Nadir Zulqernain, Ph.D.
    Posted by Nadir Zulqernain, Ph.D., Kirkland, Washington | Mar 22, 2010

    I found Peter Cox's comments amusing as clearly, he sis neither into networking, nor into selling:-)

  • myantfarm.com 
Seattle, Washington 
James "Shoes" Walker
    Posted by James "Shoes" Walker, Seattle, Washington | Mar 23, 2010

    Let's just introduce the elephant in the room. People who do not know how to sell, are afraid of sales, do not like sales, or who are not convinced of the overwhelming value of what they have to offer will do ANYTHING to avoid the inevitable rejection that comes from selling.

    People are SO afraid of selling that they will spend thousands of dollars on books, seminars, and CD's telling them one big lie- selling doesn't work.

    Good news, it's a matter of training. The proverb, "If you can walk, you can dance. If you can speak, you can sing" can be modified as follows: "If you are passionate about what you have to offer and are convinced of the overwhelming value that can offer your fellow wo/man, you can learn to sell."

  • Motivational Speaker and Author 
Bothell, Washington 
John C Erdman
    Posted by John C Erdman, Bothell, Washington | Mar 23, 2010

    Here! Here!

  • Video Production  
Renton, Washington 
Michael Schuett
    Posted by Michael Schuett, Renton, Washington | Mar 24, 2010

    "If you are passionate about what you have to offer and are convinced of the overwhelming value that can offer your fellow wo/man."...and if you are trained/schooled in the proper techniques you can sell. Being passionate, positive, energetic, and believing in your product is hugely important in progressing in sales. But you also have to know how to overcome objections, and how to close...sometimes multiple times. And the fear you speak of "Shoes" is carried into the close, where the seemingly simple task of asking a reasonable question like, "Would you like to own it?" is petrifying to people.

  • myantfarm.com 
Seattle, Washington 
James "Shoes" Walker
    Posted by James "Shoes" Walker, Seattle, Washington | Mar 24, 2010

    It's MOSTLY about the objections/rejection that scare people, absotively!

    And, the seasoned sales folk know:

    A good presentation, thorough and passionate, prevents a LOT of objections, and a good salesperson will collect their objections and start learning to build in the overcoming thereof in their presentation.

    But even more important is having a strong self image and shifting your paradigm to understand objections/rejections as "gifts" to point the way to improvement.......

    Now, enough talk, I still have time to make sales calls to Hawaii! Shoes

  • Mentor For Hire 
Kirkland, Washington 
Nadir Zulqernain, Ph.D.
    Posted by Nadir Zulqernain, Ph.D., Kirkland, Washington | Mar 24, 2010

    Id' like to see a "close-off' match between 'Shoes' & Michael - as they both seems to know their stuff and are probably 'master closers' - to me, there is nothing better than watching a 'professional salesperson' at work! Its a thrill.

  • Video Production  
Renton, Washington 
Michael Schuett
    Posted by Michael Schuett, Renton, Washington | Mar 24, 2010

    Nadir- Though I haven't said it yet I greatly appreciate your contributions to this subject, especially the light comment just posted. Shoes might just take me in any "Close-off". It appears he brings chutz-pa and knowledge where my contributions might lack pizzazz. :-)

    It's an important discussion. One I was pleased to have started in the hopes those new or renewed to the sales profession might benefit.

  • Video Production  
Renton, Washington 
Michael Schuett
    Posted by Michael Schuett, Renton, Washington | Apr 23, 2010

    Had a coffee meeting with a business colleage yesterday, and got into a serious discussion over selling and closing versus relationship selling. Of course I maintained that business owners don't "Close" enough and that it's to their detriment. He argued, rather strongly and self righteously that "people don't want to be sold" and "I prefer to serve other people and if they need my services they can ask me". In other words the same "feel good" useless advice that far to many people buy into. Then I asked him about his business and he proceeded to "present" to me and then "close" me. Repeatedly. He repeatedly asked the closing question. Good for him. I'm glad he did. But it further illistrates to me that "closing" is still the most vital component to successful business sales. My guess is those who are successful with relationship selling really are "closing" but have been convinced that calling it such is beneath them.

    Michael Schuett

    www.totalbroadcasting.com

  • Internet Sales Consultant 
Seattle, Washington 
Howard Howell
    Posted by Howard Howell, Seattle, Washington | Apr 26, 2010

    Michael... Great Article. I hope more people read it. If I can throw in my two cents, I'd like to say that Networking is a form of Marketing and suggest that a balance between Marketing and Selling must be found by each of us.

    Marketing is determining what customers want and attracting them through communications and business development. Networking is a form of communication that can involve business development if performed properly.

    Selling is persuading customers to buy a product or service by helping them get what they want. It is an art that takes time and effort to learn how to do it effortlessly.

    Marketing is not Selling. Marketing can attract customers but Selling is necessary to create revenue.

    And without producing revenue from your networking relationship, you are just a commercial visitor.

    ...Howard

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